Argyle pinot noir review: TOUGH CALL

17 07 2011

Today it’s a 2009 pinot from Oregon that costs $23 at Total Wine.

Argyle pinot noir smells wonderful.  Cola, mushroom, rose petals, some fairly hot alcohol AND a kind of warm caramel all invade your sinuses as you bring this to your nose.  The problem: the taste, although satisfying, is maybe a little boring for a $23 pinot.  It’s definitely not bad, though.  Argyle pinot noir is:  Soft.  Complex, because you get more than one flavor.  But it’s not “super” complex.  I get cola and spicy rose petals.  Interesting.  And easy to drink.

This one is hard to judge.  In its favor: it tastes good, and is an elegant, warm, medium-bodied pinot from our nation’s very best producer of pinot noir (Oregon).  Against it: at this price — which disqualifies this wine as a daily drinker — there are other wines that will offer more of a “wow” experience.

I’ll choose to recommend Argyle, because it really is very good, it does nothing wrong, and it’s modestly priced  — among Oregon pinots (which in general are, admittedly, overpriced). 

Argyle pinot noir reviewRecommended.





Chateau Bois Redon bordeaux superieur review: oh, MY, GOODNESS

12 07 2011

Today we review a 2009 blend of 75% merlot, 25% cabernet sauvignon from France.  It’s $10 at Total Wine.

If you ever wonder why some people say that U.S. wines are too sweet, this is a wine for you to try.  It’s just merlot and cabernet, but it tastes NOTHING like the merlot and cabernet that most Americans are familiar with.  Smell: pure alcohol.  Taste:

Dried cherry and coffee.  Lots of dry cocoa-like tannins on the finish.  Almost bitter, yet has a soft leathery texture.  Serious.  Elegant.  Medium bodied.  Understated.  Tastes “tight” and too reserved when first opened, gets better on day 2.  This dark burgundy-red wine from Bordeaux is absolutely killer for $10.   I say give it a try, especially if you don’t drink French wine.  Maybe pop open a Washington or California merlot to go with it.  Compare and contrast.  Let us know what you think!

Chateau Bois Redon bordeaux superieur reviewRecommended.





Peirano Estate Heritage Collection petite sirah review: OH MAMA

30 06 2011

Hi!  This (hopefully) wraps up our special series of rushed, poorly written wine reviews of good wines.  Today we chug down a 2008 petite sirah from Lodi, California that costs around $13.

Peirano Estate is not super well-known, but the label says they have been growing grapes since 1895 (wow).  This Heritage Collection petite sirah is full bodied, super dark, deep, luscious, ripe, oaky, warm, and very juicy.  It has a medium-to-high amount of mouth-drying tannins, and it doesn’t have too much of any one thing, so its elements come together with impressive balance.  (Many petite sirahs can be tannic monsters.)

For $13, this wine is flat-out incredible.  I would have recommended it at $18.  The only thing that seems “less than $20” about Peirano Estate Heritage Collection is that the various fruit flavors are hard to pin down — you just know you’re getting dark red and black fruits — and that’s fine.  It’s possible that you will find it too heavy, or just “too much,” but that’s true for any petite sirah.  This one is delicious, is hereby awarded a “Best Value” award, and is:

Peirano Estate Heritage Collection petite sirah review

Highly Recommended.





Clos Robert pinot noir review: KEEPIN’ IT REAL

8 06 2011

Today we look at a 2008 pinot from Oregon that cost me $13, but can be found for $10 if you look around.

Clos Robert seems like an unusually small winery, which is cool.  I can’t find much about them, beyond this.  Now, this wine is very inexpensive for an Oregon pinot.  Is it any good?

Yes!!  It’s not a crowd-pleaser and it’s not super-complex, but for a bargain Oregon pinot noir, Clos Robert is very, very good.  It gives you a kick when you first taste it — bright acidic cherry, followed by mushroom, cola and strawberry, along with a healthy dose of spices.  Juicy, not much in the way of tannins.  The best parts:  Clos Robert doesn’t really do anything wrong, and for this low price, it has TONS of “real pinot” in it. 

What’s the secret?  I think the 2008 vintage in Oregon was just extremely friendly.  Either way, at $10 or even $13, this Oregon pinot is:

Clos Robert pinot noir review  Highly recommended.





Louis Chavy Bourgogne pinot noir review: haw-haw-HONNHHH!!

7 06 2011

Today we review a 2009 pinot noir from France that costs $15 at Total Wine.

This wine is so French (the word Bourgogne in its name means burgundy), yet, it’s American in a very important way.  French: it’s not juicy, jammy, or sweet in any way, it’s light-to-medium bodied, and it’s hard to love, at first.  Kind of stand-off-ish.  (Fun facts: burgundy is an area in east France, and red burgundy wine is almost all pinot noir.) 

American: the label actually says “pinot noir.”  French labels almost never give you this useful info, which seems incredible, and makes me want to slap my gloves in their face.  So, how does it taste?  It’s adult.  Louis Chavy Bourgogne pinot noir is dry, spicy, cranberry-ish, and very, very serious. 

I love it.  It’s the kind of wine I can drink by itself, and finish almost a whole bottle in one sitting, without realizing it.  It is not for white wine drinkers, or those who complain that red wines are too bitter, or sour.  But if you like exploring, if you like pinot noir, if you find most red wines too sweet, and especially if you love budget burgundy, Louis Chavy Bourgogne pinot noir at $15 is definitely:

Louis Chavy Bourgogne pinot noir review Recommended.





Project Paso red wine blend review: HEY NOW

3 06 2011

Today we look at the 2009 Project Paso red blend from Paso Robles California, which costs around $11.

This is a second label from Sebastiani.  It’s fun and flavorful, with an original personality that will save your life if you are bored to death with same-tasting California reds.  In fact, it is all-around excellent for an $11 wine.  At 14.8% alcohol, it will rock your block.  This is party wine, people.

The fun begins with the funky new unwrappable rubber “cork”, built into the red/orange lid.  Project Paso red blend smells like caramel.  When first opened, it is reserved, with pleasurable medium-bodied texture but mysterious flavors.  On Day 2 it blossoms, jammy, intense, and filled with deep dark fruit.  Moderate tannins.  Luscious black raspberry and cranberry flavors meet up with dark coffee and spices, spices, spices.  All with a slight “dusty” quality.  Brought to a dinner party recently, the bottle was quickly consumed.

A blend of grenache, zinfandel, petite sirah and mourvedre, Project Paso is a clear Best Value winner — hence the guy at the slot machine.  It is enthusiastically:

Project Paso red wine blend review

Recommended.





Chateau Ste. Michelle “Indian Wells” merlot review

1 06 2011

Hi!  Today we are reviewing a 2009 merlot from Washington State that is $13 at Costco.

OK Washington merlot is supposed to be sweet and jammy.  This merlot IS kind of sweet, because it’s very fruit-forward.  But it’s also a little spicy, and has some leather/chocolate going on.  Maybe a tiny bit of tobacco.

At $13, I give it a thumbs-up.  It’s not “great”, but it is definitely nice, and does not do anything wrong if you like warm, jammy, velvety merlot.   BUT — there’s a caveat.  You really have to let it breathe, for at least an hour.  When you first open it, the only thing you will smell is alcohol, and it will be almost tasteless.  Just takes a while to open up.

Chateau Ste. Michelle "Indian Wells" merlot reviewRecommended.